CU de la US
Luis Miguel Villar Angulo

El niño global: cómo los expertos cambiarían la educación

El niño global: cómo los expertos cambiarían la educación

The Global Child: How Experts Would Change Education

 por

Robert Dean Hobbs

El Dr. Robert Dean Hobbs ha tenido la cortesía de enviarme un fichero pdf que contiene el libro completo titulado:

  • (2016) The Global Child: How Experts Would Change Education: Research- Based Acquistion of Languages. Lambert Academic Publishing. ISBN 978-3-659-88120-6.

(Pulse The Global Child)

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

LIST OF TABLES…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 15

LIST OF FIGURES…………………………………………………………………………………………… 17

PART ONE: IMPROVING GLOBAL EDUCATION………………………………… 19

Chapter 1. Setting-up the study……………………………………………………………………… 21

Background

TheProblem………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 24

Statement of the purpose………………………………………………………………………………….. 25

Significance of the study…………………………………………………………………………………. 26

To Learners

To Leaders

Nature of the study………………………………………………………………………………………….. 27

Overview of Research Method

Research Design Appropriateness…………………………………………………………………. 28

Research questions…………………………………………………………………………………………. 29

General Query…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 30

Research  Question #1

Research  Question #2

Chapter 2. Conceptual and Theoretical Framework………………………………… 31

Overview of the Theoretical Area of Multilingualism…………………………………. 32

Definitions……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 34

Multilingual                       Terminology                        Defined Assumptions…. 37

Scope of the study……………………………………………………………………………………………. 40

Limitations of the study………………………………………………………………………………….. 41

Delimitations……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 42

Part One Summary of the Study…………………………………………………………………… 43

PART TWO: REVIEW OF SUPPORTING RESEARCH…………………………… 46

Chapter 3. Shortcomings of monolingual education………………………………. 47

Chapter 4. Premise: Multilingual Cognitive  Superiority…………………………… 52

Bilingual Research…………………………………………………………………………………………… 53

Trilingual Research

Higher Education Multilingual  Evidence…………………………………………………….. 55

Analysis of the Evidence Significance of the Evidence

Chapter 5. Theoretical foundation: DMM.…………………………………………………. 57

Dynamic Model of Multilingualism (DMM) Processing and Storage Syntagmatic Memory Precedes Dual Language Memory

Memory Storage Differentiation………………………………………………………………………. 58

Neurological Investigation into 18 Languages Bilingual Memory Storage

Evidence for Supporting First Languages………. ………………………………………………. 59

Deconstructing the Synergistic Equation of Curriculum & Instruction……60

 Chapter 6. Hobbs CI-HD Interface Model and Equation………………………….. 63

[CI-HD = Curriculum Instruction – Human Development]

Multiple Domain Factors and Human Development Domains…………………….. 65

Chapter 7. Human Development…………………………………………………………………… 68

Language Acquisition Infant Studies

 Trilingual Tot Language Accuracy Study……………………………………………………….. 69

Developmental Language Intervention Studies

Voice Modulation Signaling Word Order……………………………………………………….. 70

Age of Ideal L2 Acquisition

Early L2 Acquisition Recommendations……………………………………………………….. 71

Chapter 8. Multilingual Speech Production Model.……………………………………. 72

Description of the Hobbs Speech  Production Model…………………………………… 75

Chapter 9. Models, Interface, and Exchange…………………………………………………. 76

Interface of Models, Theories, and Research…………………………………………………… 77

Information Exchange for Education………………………………………………………………. 78

 Chapter 10. The Cognitive Domain………………………………………………………………. 79

Benefit of Ambiguity in Cognitive Stimulation Neurolinguistics

Sublexical Modal Routing

ReciprocalModalities……………………………………………………………………………… 80

Syntax Correlation with Synaptic Electrochemical Activation Psycholinguistics…   81

Priming and Timing Study Cognitive Linguistic Research

Controversy of Automaticity………………………………………………………………………….. 82

Neural Recruitment Facilitates Complex Processing

Benefits of Ambiguity……………………………………………………………………………………… 83

Psychomotor Domain Pragmatics………. 84

Chapter 11. Affective and Motivation Domains.………………………………………. 86

 Identity Integration Affiliation and Proficiency

Sociolinguistics……………………………………………………………………………………………… 87

Codeswitching

Role of Language Typology

Translation for Identification…………………………………………………………………………. 88

Intergenerational Study

Multilingual Family Typology……………………………………………………………………… 89

Hispanic-American Study Hong Kong Study

Australian study…………………………………………………………………………………..90

Chapter 12. The School Domain..…………………………………………………………………. 91

Deficit Model of Education

ZPD, Assessment, and  Self-Management……………………………………………………….. 92

Self-Efficacy Study with Arabic-English Students

Dual Coding Theory AdaptedforEducation………………………………………………… 93

Digital Video Effectiveness Study………………………………………………………………….. 93

Multilingual Education Models……………………………………………………………………… 94

Variety of European ModelsofEducation…………………………………………………….. 95

Saturday Schools in Britain & NYC………………………………………………………………. 96

Asian Model of Education…………………………………………………………………………….. 97

Educational Models: Rights, Capability, and Human Capital

Chapter 13. Education Policy………………………………………………………………………….. 99

Policy Alignment: Human Rights and Language Development………………… 100

Application of the Expand Empowerment Education Models

Chapter 14. Meta Literature Review…………………………………………………………… 102

Feasibility Study Impact

Consent Forms and Bilingual Studies…………………………………………………………… 103

Proficiency Bias Study………………………………………………………………………………….. 104

Prominent Research Themes

Narrow Margin Analysis Impact…………………………………………………………………… 105

Policy Implications of Neurological Research

Convergent Model Implications for Policy Makers…………………………………….. 107

Part Two Summary of the Literature Search.……………………………………………. 108

PART THREE: METHODOLOGY…………………………………………………………….. 111

Chapter 15. Details of the Research Method.……………………………………………. 112

Research Method and Design Appropriateness Qualitative Method Rationale

Grounded Theory Design Rationale…………………………………………………………….. 113

Process Approach………………………………………………………………………………..115

Simultaneous Constant Comparative Data Analysis Research Design Elaboration

Assessing Models

Internet Distribution and Piloting……………………………………………………………….. 116

Piloting the Questionnaire

Sampling, Data Collection, Procedures, Rationale……………………………………… 117

Population Reputational Sampling

Saturation……………………………………………………………………………..118

Confidentiality

Review of Research Questions……………………………………………………………………. 118

Pilot Data Collection Instrument…………………………………………………………………. 119

Pilot Interview Questions

Reliability of the instrument…………………………………………………………………………. 120

Validity:                               External,                                Internal Reliability…… 121

Appropriate Sample Threat to Validity

Data Analysis……………………………………………………………………….. 122

Themes

SUMMARY  OF METHODOLOGICAL DETAILS……………………. 123

Expertise Established as Participant Qualification Beneficiaries of the Multilingual Study Outcomes

PART FOUR: DATA ANALYSIS RESULTS…………………………………………..125

Research Questions

Chapter 16. Results: From Pilot to Main Study……………………………………….. 126

Pilot Study

The Instrument for the Main Study Interview Questions

Follow-up Questions………………………………………………………………………..127

Description of Internet Interview Procedures and Protocols Acquisition of the R esearch Sample

Sample Selection Rationale………………………………………………………………………… 128

Sample Demographics

Chapter 17. Main Study Results………………………………………………………………….. 131

Data Collection Process

Data Analysis, Procedures, and Presentation  of Findings………………………… 132

Initial Code Phase

Focused Code Phase…………………………………………………………………………………… 133

Axial Code Phase

First Interview Summary of answers………………………………………………………. 133

 First Interview Follow-Up Question…………………………………………………………… 135

Second Interview Summary of Answers…………………………………………………….. 135

Theme 1: Need for Changes…………………………………………………………………………….. 136

Sub-themes 1a-1f

 Theme 2: Teacher Training Needs Improvement…………………………………………… 137

Sub-themes 2a-2d

Sub-theme 2e-2h………………………………………………………………………………………. 138

Theme 3: Dismay………………………………………………………………………………….. 139

Theme  4: Constraints

Theme  5: Advantages

Second Interview Follow-Up Question……………………………………………………….. 141

Theme 1: Too Difficult to Answer

Theme 2: Advantageous……………………………………………………………………….. 142

Third Interview Question Summary of Answers

Third Question Follow-Up…………………………………………………………………………… 143

Fourth Interview Question Summary of Answers…………………………………….. 144

Fourth Interview Follow-Up Question…………………………………………………………. 145

Invariant Themes

Variables Important for a Theoretical Model…………………………………………………. 146

Chapter 18. Triangulating Thematic Relationships………………………………… 148

Repetitive Themes

Emerging Themes…………………………………………………………………………… 152

PART FOUR SUMMARY…………………………………………………………………………….. 156

PART FIVE:

CONCLUSIONS, IMPLICATIONS, RECOMMENDATIONS………….. 157

Chapter 19. Overview and Summary of  the Findings.…………………………….. 158

Summary of the Findings……………………………………………………………………………….. 160

Chapter 20. Research Conclusions and Implications…………………………….. 162

When to Introduce L2 and L3

L2 and L3 as Medium of Instructions

Greatest Impact of Research……………………………………………………………………………. 163

Dismay………………………………………………………………………… 165

Advantages of Multilingual Education………………………………………………………. 166

Notional-Functional Aesthetic-Pragmatism………………………………………………… 167

What All Teachers Should Know

Sociolinguistic Impact…………………………………………………………………………………… 168

Language Group Receptivity………………………………………………………………………. 171

When to Introduce Similar Language  Group Receptivity…………………………. 173

Chapter 21. Proposal of an Integrated Model…………………………………………… 175

Principles of Third Language Learning………………………………………………………… 176

Macro Layer of Multilingual Education……………………………………………………… 177

Changes to the Macro Model per the  Participant Data………………………………. 178

Meso Layer of Multilingual Education………………………………………………………… 180

Changes to the Meso Model per the Participant Data

Micro Layer of Multilingual Education……………………………………………………….. 182

Changes to the Micro Model per the  Participant Data……………………………….. 183

Tools for the Integrated Model of Multilingualism…………………………………….. 185

Macro theoretical tools

Macro layer pragmatic tool for  professionaldevelopment…………………………. 187

Macro layer tool for constraint evaluation………………………………………………….. 190

Meso and microtools…………………………………………………………… 191

Chapter 22. Addressing the Problem………………………………………………………….. 197

Addressing the Components of the Specific Problem The Meaning of Context

Addressing the Research  Questions……………………………………………………………. 198

Chapter 23. Recommendations………………………………………. 199

Recommendations at the Macro Layer…………………………………………………………….. 199

Recommendations at the Meso Layer……………………………………………………………. 200

Recommendations at the Micro Layer

Chapter 24. Further Research………………………………………………………………………. 201

Lack of Communication of Research Outcomes Fun Activities for Children Learning Languages Accuracy versus Communicative Approaches

Grammar versus Focus-on-Form Approaches……………………………………………… 202

Notional-Functional Aesthetic-Pragmatic Strategies for Curriculum Realistic Learner Goals

Creative Aspect of Language Production…………………………………………………… 203

Suggestions for Using the Model of Multilingual Education

Chapter 25. Conclusion and Summary……………………………………………………… 205

Significance to Leaders, Learners, and Literature Contribution to the field of Multilingualism

Gap in the literature………………………………………………………………………………. 206

Limitations………………………………………………………………………….. 207

Transferability of the Outcomes…………………………………………………………………….. 208

PART FIVE SUMMARY…………………………………………………………………………….. 209

REFERENCES……………………………………………………………………… 211

APPENDIX Table of Contents…………………………………………………………………….. 241

APPENDIX A: Summary of Higher Education L3 Studies……………………… 242

APPENDIX B: Permission………………………………………………………………………… 243

APPENDIX C: Invitation to Pilot Research……………………………………………. 245

APPENDIX D: Professional Research Affiliation Query……………..246

APPENDIX E: Participant Demographic Query…………………………. 247

APPENDIX F: Confidentiality…………………………………………………………………… 249

APPENDIX G: Pilot Instrument…………………………………………………………………. 250

APPENDIX H: Main Study Instrument…………………………………………………….. 271

APPENDIX I: Summary of Invitation to Participate  in Research……………. 272

APPENDIX J: Mid-Study Change for  Greater Efficiency………………………… 273

APPENDIX K: Main Study Data Analysis………………………………………………. 274

APPENDIX L: Functional Notional Theory, Pragmatic-Aesthetics..…289 INDEX…                  292

About the author…………………………………………………………………… 303


A continuación presento un párrafo en español correspondiente a las pp. 205-206. 

Importancia para Líderes, Estudiantes y la Literatura

El objetivo de este estudio fue construir un modelo de educación multilingüe para ayudarlos responsables politicos y los líderes escolares a diseñar un currículo que reforzara las lenguas maternas (L1) a la vez que aumentaban otros idiomas (L2, L3). El estudio piloto se diseñó para evaluar modelos adaptadosconstruidos con información bibliográfica. Los participantes del estudio piloto recomendaron adaptar los modelos en función de las respuestas de los participantes en el estudio. Después del estudiolos modelos se integraron para representar tres niveles de educación multilingüe. Las tres perspectivas incluyen escuelasestudiantesprocesamiento cognitivo.

Importancia para los aprendices. Aprender varios idiomas debería mejorar la comunicación y las habilidades metacognitivas, además de contribuir a mejorar el ambiente de las escuelas multiculturales. Se debe facilitar la tolerancia de la diferencia. La empatía hacia los inmigrantes que aprenden el idioma dominante debería mejorar ya que los estudiantes que hablan el idioma dominante como lengua materna luchan por mejorar sus habilidades en el idioma extranjero.

Contribución al campo del multilingüismo. La gran mejora en la tecnología de escaneo cerebral ha ofrecido a los neurolingüistas y psicolingüistas mejores equipos para realizar investigaciones. La afirmación de que la sintaxis puede correlacionarse con la activación sináptica y neuronal es exclusiva de este estudio y merece una mayor investigación en la investigación neurolingüística para la intervención investigadora. Otra implicación en la literatura es que la tonalidad vocal puede correlacionarse con la asimilación de la sintaxis y podría ser útil como una estrategia de enseñanza.

La investigación sociolingüística (Ushioda y Dornyei, 2009) ha innovado la forma en que los educadores deberían percibir las identidades dinámicas como los yo-ideales, los seres propios y los seres temidos. Las entrevistas a investigadores multilingües involucrados en una variedad de tipos de investigación debería haber revelado el consenso y la controversia entre sus percepciones sobre cómo mejorar la educación.

El campo del multilingüismo es relativamente nuevo. El bilingüismo fue un enfoque de los investigadores en el siglo XX. La investigación del multilingüismo está ganando impulso en el siglo XXI. Los participantes del estudio en esta investigación eran hablantes de diferentes idiomas que residían en diversas partes del mundo e investigaron diferentes campos de investigación dentro de la investigación multilingüe.

Redes Sociales

Deja un comentario

Luis Miguel Villar Angulo